Co-working Office Space Design

Co-working spaces have popped up globally and continue to double nearly every year. They initially started off when people decided they wanted a place to work together but didn’t want the restrictions of the traditional office space. They have now become a financially viable business.

Most people who have experience working in the co-working community agree that if there’s a co-working space near you then it’s better to work from there rather than create your own.

However, if there’s no space suitable to your needs or you simply feel like being adventurous then you should get familiar with the physical requirements of co-working space design.

Here are some resources to get you started with co-working office design inspiration:

Design Stores Doubling as Co-working Spaces – A look into how furniture and design stores use co-working to bring more people into their showrooms.

Before Incubation, A Co-working Space for Start-Up Conception – An article on CoCoon, one of Hong Kong’s most popular co-working environments. The building features only large desks, no cubicles, metal lockers and even foosball and ping pong.

Feng Shui Checklist for Co-working and Collaborative Spaces – Tips on making sure that the physical structure and design of your co-working space is creative enough to positively influence interaction. 

‘Working in the Un-Office’ in the Financial Times – An interview with Ian Sanders from the Financial Times containing the dos and don’ts of co-working, why a co-working environment is better than a coffee shop and how co-working influences creativity, innovation and interaction.

Global Co-working Blog – In the spirit of collaboration, the Global Co-working Blog is a great place for anyone to share their knowledge and experience about co-working while learning from others as well.

Space Matters: Using Design to Build a Co-working Community – A look at how the layout of the room, types of tables, colors and private spaces can influence the interaction between a co-working community. 

The Low-Down on Co-working – A list of different factors that you should consider before starting your own co-working space including consideration of costs, assessing the environment and monitoring your own personal habits.